Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Antidepressants Can Add Years to Your Face

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. - Your mother's wrinkles — or lack thereof, may not be the best predictor of how you'll age. In fact, a new study claims just the opposite. The study, involving identical twins, suggests that despite genetic make-up, certain environmental factors can add years to a person's perceived age. Results just published reveal that factors like divorce or the use of antidepressants are the real culprits that can wreak havoc on one's face.

According to Dr. Guyuron, "the presence of stress could be one of the common denominators in those twins who appeared older." Antidepressant use was associated with a significantly older appearance. Researchers said it may be that depression itself increased facial aging, or it’s possible that use of antidepressant drugs relaxed facial muscles in a way that increased the appearance of aging.



(Age 64. Twin on right suffers from depression, and appears older)

In other words, if the misery of your divorce doesn't age you, your attempt to treat it with Prozac might.

Full article

6 comments:

Rocketstar said...

The sun is also a huge factor if I am not mistaken.

Mags said...

Oh, I don't know. I'm on an anti-depressant and people think I'm WAY younger than I am when they see me.

Thomas said...

Rocket, truer words have rarely been spoken: the sun is probably the biggest contributor to aging.

Mags, I've been on an antidepressant for quite some time (since Clinton was Prez, in fact) and would have no problem if it made me look like Benjamin Button. Well, I probably would a tad, but I think you get my point. In any case, I think I look pretty good for a guy who God (my higher self?) once put through the wringer.

Randy said...

You know, looking at that set of twins, I hope I don't look as bad as EITHER ONE of them when I'm 64...

Timothy Smith said...

I could care less what I look like now, I got married.

Sarah said...

and depression can take years off your life, so it's a fair trade, imo.